© TOKYO PHOTOGRAPHIC ART MUSEUM and OSHIMA Kenichiro

Urban-Data Complex

Urban-Data Complex

Yebisu International Festival for Art and Alternative Visions 2017: Multiple Future

Tokyo, 10 – 26 February 2017

Can architecture provide new tools of political analysis and intervention?

Urban-Data Complex presented two recent investigations at the Yebisu International Festival for Art and Alternative Visions 2017 that encapsulate the idea of reading and reconstructing violence through the city form.

The first investigation, Rafah: Black Friday, was undertaken in close partnership with Amnesty International, this investigation focuses on four days of the summer 2014 attack on Gaza by the Israeli military. The controversial Hannibal directive resulted in the heaviest civilian death toll of the entire conflict, and the extensive destruction of Rafah’s built environment.

The second investigation explored through this exhibition was Air Strike Atimah. This case used clips found in social media websites online to investigate three air strikes on 8 March 2015, near the town of Atimah in Syria and the displaced persons camp of the same name, both abutting the Northern border to Turkey.

Videos and images from the investigations were accompanied by bomb cloud models. A bomb cloud is made of everything a building once was: concrete, plaster, soil, glass, flesh, and is thus architecture in gaseous form, an event as monument that exists for seven to nine minutes. If modelled correctly, it can also provide valuable evidence in legal cases. Forensic Architecture are able to use mainstream and social media images of these clouds to create 3D models, which help to approximate the date and precise location of bomb strikes, aiding human rights agencies to compile valuable reports about conflict zones.

Stills from the exhibition by OSHIMA Kenichiro © TOKYO PHOTOGRAPHIC ART MUSEUM

Contributors

  • Eyal Weizman
  • Christina Varvia
  • Nick Axel
  • Francesco Sebregondi
  • Camila E. Sotomayor
  • Vere Van Gool
  • Shourideh C. Molavi
  • Gustav A. Toftgaard
  • Dorette Panagiotopoulou
  • Jamon Van Den Hoek
  • Rosario Güiraldes
  • Hania Halabi
  • Jacob Burns
  • Mohammed Abdullah
  • Kent Klich
  • Ana Naomi de Sousa
  • Susan Schuppli
  • Chris Cobb-Smith

The satellite image is produced from NASA's Landsat sattelite. Shades of green highlight healthy forest and shades of violate show cleared land. The image shows Indigenous territories being dispossessed through expansion of Palm oil plantations.

Ape Law

Ape Law

3rd Istanbul Design Biennial, Istanbul

22 October – 20 November 2016

Ape Law examines human-induced environmental violence on other species. Utilising the example of Sandra, the first ape in the world to be granted human rights by an Argentine criminal appeals court in 2015, the exhibit asks whether tropical forest fires can be legally recognised as acts of mass murder against the orangutans inhabiting them. A new kind of forensic archaeology tracks their fate by monitoring signs of their temporary architecture in the treetops.

This exhibition is organised by Forensic Architecture in collaboration with FIBAR: Baltasar Garzón, m7red and Irendra Radjawali (United Kingdom, Spain, Brazil, Argentina).

Selected views of the exhibition: © Forensic Architecture

Contributors

  • Eyal Weizman
  • Paulo Tavares
  • Samaneh Moafi
  • Christina Varvia
  • Nabil Ahmed
  • Sophie Springer
  • Lorenzo Pezzani
  • Jason Men
  • Nichola Czyz

 

 

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Reporting From The Front

Reporting From The Front

La Biennale di Venezia 2016, Venice

28 May – 27 November 2016

“We would like the Biennale Architettura 2016 to offer a new point of view … Given the complexity and variety of challenges that architecture has to respond to, REPORTING FROM THE FRONT will be about listening to those that were able to gain some perspective and consequently are in the position to share some knowledge and experiences with those of us standing on the ground.” – Alejandro Aravena

In this exhibition, Forensic Architecture presents elements from four recent investigations. Undertaken at different scales, these cases extend from the micro-analysis of a single ruin from a drone strike in Miranshah, Pakistan, to an urban analysis of the city of Rafah in Gaza under Israeli attack; the death of refugees and migrants in the Mediterranean Sea, to the environmental violence along the shifting climatic frontiers of desertification and deforestation.

While architecture adds an essential method of investigation, forensics demands of architects the closest attention to the materiality of the built environment and its media representations. It also challenges architectural analysis to be performed publicly and politically in the most antagonistic of forums.

The 15th International Architecture Exhibition, titled REPORTING FROM THE FRONT, is directed by Alejandro Aravena and organised by La Biennale di Venezia chaired by Paolo Baratta.

Selected views of the exhibition: © Forensic Architecture

Contributors

  • Eyal Weizman
  • Christina Varvia
  • Paulo Tavares
  • Charles Heller
  • Lorenzo Pezzani
  • Samaneh Moafi
  • Hana Rizvanolli
  • Ariel Caine
  • Ana Naomi De Sousa
  • Susan Schuppli
  • Steffen Kramer
  • Francesco Sebregondi
  • Nick Axel
  • Jacob Burns
  • Blake Fisher
  • Reisner Beeliz
  • Samir Harb
  • Zahara Hussain
  • Shourideh Molavi
  • Jamon Van Der Hoek
  • Hania Halabi
  • Vere Van Gool
  • Camila Solomayor
  • Rosario Guiraldes
  • Mohammed Abdullah
  • Tom Tlalim
  • Giulia Bruno
  • Jan Klesswetter
  • Giuseppe Ileasi
  • Armin Linke
  • Alina Schmuch